Couples who divorce in Michigan or other U.S. states will either go through a contested or uncontested divorce. A contested divorce occurs whenever both individuals cannot reach an agreement about certain terms such as child support, alimony, the division of assets, and custody arrangements. In an uncontested divorce, the couple is able to reach an agreement about every term of the process and does not need a court to intervene. Uncontested divorces are often settled faster and with less complications and financial strain.

Contested divorce

In many instances, couples who are facing divorce will begin undergoing the process of a contested divorce. After realizing the complications and financial obligations of going through a contested divorce, some couples will reach an agreement prior to an actual trial. This arrangement is referred to as a settlement. The main benefits of reaching a settlement is that each party can have the assurance of finality and an end to litigation.

Uncontested divorce

If a couple cannot reach a settlement on their own, they may have to rely on attorneys and the court system to reach one eventually. In an uncontested divorce, it is generally not recommended that either party tries to represent themselves. The complex nature of a contested divorce is wide-ranging, and the emotional and financial repercussions can be significant.

While most couples who are divorcing will strive for an uncontested process, this may not always be feasible, especially when animosity is present. An individual who’s facing a contested divorce should consider seeking the guidance of an experienced divorce attorney. An attorney may be able to help a person navigate through the process of settling child custody, property division, alimony, custody agreements, and other matters pertaining to divorce with greater understanding.