Gender equality in Michigan is a slow process, but it is happening. Though many women still make less than their male colleagues for the same position with similar qualifications, they are nonetheless making their own money. In some instances, that might still mean making more than their spouse. After all, an underpaid doctor who is a woman may still outearn her husband who is a teacher.

If these marriages end, women sometimes end up footing the bill for alimony. MarketWatch notes that this comes as a surprise to many ex-wives, but it is a possibility. In fact, a survey back in 2018 reported that 45% of lawyers had noticed an increase in instances where women were paying their ex-spouses alimony. Another 54% noticed an increase in women paying for child support while the children remained with their fathers.

Women out-earn their husbands in four out of every ten American families. Sometimes this is because the man has a lower-paying job. However, some studies have shown that this often happens when the man is not earning a wage at all. He may be a full-time student, be working on a “side hustle” or is taking time off from work to focus on his passion.

Nevertheless, men rarely do get alimony. Forbes states that this is primarily because many of them do not ask. Gender equality is still a new concept in America and men of all ages are learning to adjust. It means the death of rigid gender roles that men and women once occupied. Even so, men often hold on to those gender roles during and after marriage.

This is why so many of them refuse to ask for alimony. Some fear the embarrassment of taking money from a woman even when they do qualify. Others view alimony from a woman as emasculating. And still, there are some who believe that they may have a much higher earning potential in the long run as men and decide to leave things as they are. Still, in the future these sentiments may change, leading to even more women paying for alimony and child support.